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Education Major Version

EDU 210 The School as a Social System
Lowe, Denise


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDU 210 The School as a Social System

Semester

SP 2013 HO

Faculty

Lowe, Denise

Title

School for Education Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

MS Instructional Leadership In Curriculum and Instruction
BA English/Liberal Studies

Office Location

Copley 213

Office Hours

Tuesday  and Thursday 11:30 to 2:30 pm

Daytime Phone

816-584-6789

E-Mail

Denise.Lowe@park.edu

Semester Dates

January 14 to May 10

Class Days

Tuesday and Thursday

Class Time

10:10 am to 11:25 am

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Mondale, S. & Patton, S (Eds.) (2001). School: The American Story of American Public Education. Boston: Beacon Press. ISBN 978-0-8-0704221-2

Ornstein, A. & Levine, D. (2010). Foundations of Education (11th Edition). New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.  ISBN 978-0-495-80895-4

Additional Readings:

Aldridge, J., Kilgo, J., & Emfinger, K. (2010). The Marginalization of Women Educators: A consequence of No Child Left Behind? Childhood Education, 87, 41-47.

Education Week. (2009). The Obama Education Plan. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Jolly J. L. & Makel, M. C. (2010). No Child Left Behind: The inadvertent costs for high-achieving and gifted students. Childhood Education, 87, 35-40.

Kirylo, J.D. (2010). An interview with Diane Ravitch. Childhood Education, 87, 48-52.

Lehr, S. S. (2010). Literacy, literature, and censorship. Childhood Education, 87, 25-34.

Rampp, L. C., Guffey, J. S., Guffey, M. K. (1998). An Administrative History of the Creation of the U.S. Department of Education May 1980: The Federal Role in Education Prior to and after the May 1980 Implementation Plan Creating the U.S. Department of Education: A Research Report. Retrieved December 18, 2010 from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED425528.pdf 

For Further Reading:

Darling-Hammond, L. (2010). The flat world and education: How America’s commitment to equity will determine our future. New York: Teacher’s College Press.

Ravtich, D. (2010). The death and life of the great American school system: How testing and choice are undermining education. Philadelphia, PA: Perseus Books Group.
Sadker, M. P. & Sadker, D. M. (2000). Teachers, Schools, and Society. New York: McGraw Hill Companies.

All Park University teacher candidates seeking certification and licensure must purchase Foliotek, the School for Education’s electronic portfolio system. As purchasing and accessing Foliotek is a multi-step process, please follow these instructions: 

1.      Decide the Contract Period and fee for which you will be paying. Minimally, you must purchase a contract which extends to the year you expect to graduate, however some students purchase a contract extending one year beyond graduation. 

 Contract Period    

 Contract Fee

Per Student (Prepaid)

Cost Breakdown

Per Student, Per Year

 1 year

 $30.00

$30.00

 2 years

 $59.00

$29.50

 3 years

 $87.00

$29.00

 4 years

 $112.00

$28.00

 5 years

$120.00

$24.00

6 years

$125.00

$20.83

2.      Send an email to Carol Williams (carol.williams@park.edu) with the following information:

a.      Your Name

b.      The Contract Period you wish to purchase

c.      Your student identification number

3.      Within a few days, you will receive from Foliotek an email with online purchasing information. Upon receipt of this email, purchase your Foliotek contract.

4.      Upon receipt of your payment, you will receive your login information. You must then send a final email to Carol Williams (carol.Williams@park.edu), requesting she provide your current education professors and a academic advisor (list them) access to view your portfolio. It is imperative you complete this final step.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
Additional readings may be assigned throughout the semester as well as viewing of videos and use of the Houghton Mifflin accompanying resources.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
 

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
EDU210 (MGE): The School as a Social System: A survey of the historical, philosophical and legal foundations of American education. Also a study of the various school systems in the United States. Selected educational problems, issues and practices will be examined in light of current social conditions.3:0:3.

Educational Philosophy:

Teaching Philosophy

As an educator, I have learned the importance of creativity and enjoyment for my profession. For me to deliver my assigned instruction it is important to own my educational development. In this, I continue to educate myself in the areas of interest and psychology. Therefore, I have a wealth of resources that assist in delivering student centered teaching; this helps students recognize the benefits of learning and what it has to offer.

It is also my responsibility to model ethical and professional behavior. I articulate the importance of respect, patience and responsibility in my courses to allow my students to feel comfortable and safe. My attention to demonstrate my expectations assist in the success of my class. I enjoy the discussion of diversity and exceptionalities in all of my courses; this is the 21st century; every classroom will have diversity and some exceptionalities. As I strive to build an active community, I find that when my students work as a team, everyone learns. Moreover, by developing a classroom atmosphere that fosters group interaction based on moral ethics, students’ are open to other viewpoints and opinions.

As an educator who teaches face-to-face and online, it is important to be focused, and organized remembering to supply timely feedback and to stay verbally connected. Students have a sense of confidence when they know their grades and the availability of their instructor.  Further, it is imperative to build relationships with students’ providing resources to those who need academic and personal assistance. As a life- long learner, I continue to seek strategies to improve my teaching; I improve by university development, conferences, research and student participation and assessment. 
 
Students learn from readings, lecture, peers, university research and community role models. While a sense of community begins at the cohort level, throughout one's college education it expands to include a global focus. Park offers its students a unique opportunity to practice that global focus through interaction with students from many nations, and each student should take advantage of that opportunity. Regardless of the course topic, critical thinking remains crucial to all classroom procedures. Thus, students will be asked to summarize what they read and hear, synthesize information from a number of sources, interact with one another in expressing conclusions, and formulate written responses. Alternate opinions and points of view will be respected and invited, and critical thinking will always be expected.

·        References:

McKeachie, W. & Svinicki, M. (2006). McKeachie’s teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers (12th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Weimer, M. (2002). Learner- centered teaching: Five key changes to practice. San Francisco: Jossey Bass

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify, describe, and explain key concepts related to the USA's historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in the field of education.
  2. Develop a comprehensive synthesis on the cultural context of education by focusing on teachers and learners, teachers and teaching, students and schools, and schools and society.
  3. Define, describe, and analyze five or more critical issues of diversity in schools.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and effective use of professional literature in the field of education.
  5. Examine the teaching profession through personal reflections and by engaging in thoughtful discussions with peers.
  6. Write a personal philosophy of education grounded in six or more beliefs, supported by three or more evidenced-based theories, which are also tied to best practice within the field of education.
  7. Demonstrate a thorough applied knowledge on the concepts and operations of electronic assessment and portfolio systems.


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities.  The core assessment for this course is the philosophy of education.  The philosophy will be developed throughout the course and completed at the end of the 4th module. (200 points)  While this activity is required, its weight related to the grade computation is to be at least 20% of the total grade for the course.  (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6}


 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

 All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities. The core assessment for this course is the philosophy of education. The philosophy will be developed throughout the course and completed toward the end of the semester (110 points) plus an additional 28 points for providing an initial outline and 60 points for editing a peer philosophy of education. While this activity is required, its weight related to the grade computation is to be at least 20% of the total grade for the course. (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6}

Course Assessment

Weekly Discussions (6 pts), Group questions and answers (6 pts), and Lessons Learned Reflections (8 pts)-Students will be expected to participate in a weekly group discussions covering the material from the course materials presented that week, and post a Lessons Learned Reflections. A rubric specifying expectations for each of these will be made available.

Weekly Discussion Question, Response, and Lessons Learned Rubrics

Each week's Discussion Questions (DQ’s) pertain to topics related to the course materials. You can earn up to six (6) points for each answer to a question and earn up to six (6) additional points for each of two responses (3 points each) to classmates' DQ answers. Lastly, each week you are asked to complete a Lessons Learned Reflection (LLR) for eight (8) points. To earn all twenty (20) points you must complete each of the three steps; answer a question, complete two group qestions, and complete a Lessons Learned Reflection in a discussion topic. The purpose of these weekly assignments is to give you an opportunity to demonstrate knowledge, comprehension, application, and synthesis of the weekly course material.

Scoring Rubrics

Discussion Question Answers

5-6

4

3

2-1

0

The answer to questions are written by Thursday midnight  CST. The answer must meet all five (5) quality indicators listed below.

The answer to a question is written by Thursday midnight CST. The answer meets four (4) indicators listed below.

The answer to a question is written by Thursday. The answer mets quality indicators 1, 2, & 3 as listed below.

The answer to a question is written by Thursday midnight CST. Quality indicators 1 and 2 are met.

The answer provided does not meet criteria.

Peer Responses Group Discussions

3

2

1

0

A quality of a new idea or perspective in response to another students original questions, statement or thought in  group discussion.

A quality of a new idea or perspective in response to another students original  question, statement or thought in group discussion.

The answer to a question meets quality indicators 1, 2, & 3 as listed below.

A new idea or perspective in response to another student's question, statement or thought met criteria 1 & 2 are met as listed below.

Lessons Learned

7 - 8

5 - 6

3 - 4

2 - 0

A quality written respnse that provides a thoughtful reflection on Lessons Learned, integrating insight for the reader as to the personal importance. The response must be completed by Thursday midnight CST and meet the criteria 1, 2, 3, & 5 listed below.

A quality written response of a thoughtful reflection on Lessons Learned. The response must be written by Thursday midnight CST and meet criteria 1, 2, & 5 listed below.

A quality written response of a thoughtful reflection is written by Thursday midnight CST; criteria 1 & 2 are met as listed below.

A reflection on Lessons Learned is provided, however it does not meet criteria.

Quality Indicators for Discussion, Questions and Statements 

Quality is measured by five criteria:

  1. The written reflection includes an answer based upon information provided in the text and/or a related source.
  2. Each type of response has a sentence minimum and each sentence must be complete and meaningful.  The response must include an application sentence regarding how the information will inform teaching or a reflection related to teaching.
    • Discussion Question (DQ) answer-minimum of 6 complete sentences.
    • Group questions and statements (PR)-minimum of 3 complete sentences.
    • Lessons Learned Reflection (LLR)-minimum of 8 complete sentences.
  3. References for the evidence are included (text & author, text page number, web site, etc.).
  4. The question is provided prior to the answer for DQ’s. The phrase “Response to ……” is provided prior to a peer response (Not pertinent to Lessons Learned).
  5. Correct spelling, punctuation, grammar, and complete sentence structure are present. No slang is used.

Bi-Weekly Quizzes (10 pts)- Bi-weekly there will be assigned reading materials provided by instructor.  Quizzes cover the readings and video content for each week. Quizzes are a combination of True/False and Multiple Choice and essay.

Philosophy of Education Outline (28 pts)- The purpose of this assignment is to provide a skeletal structure that will lay the organizational structure for the Philosophy of Education that you will write as the Core Assessment for EDU 210. Refer to the “Philosophy of Education Outline” form and Decription-Completing the Philosophy of Education Outline” document to complete the assignment. Turn this assignment in by Thursday of Week 2.

Class Activity (45 pts)- During Week 4 students may choose one of two activities to complete the requirements for the Class Activity. Both activities can earn a total of 45 points and both activities are related to Chapter 5, Foundation of Education (Orstein, et al., 2011). Chapter 5 covers the historical development of American education, covering topics in addition to those presented in the PBS video series and other selected DVD's. Becoming familiar with this material will provide additional depth and breadth of knowledge. Both activity choices have the same requirements, just different content; one focusing on historical facts and influential individuals and the other focus is on education in a culturally diverse society from a historical perspective. Regardless of whether you choose Activity 1 or Activity 2 content, you may either write a five page paper APA style or prepare a PowerPoint presentation, no longer than 20 slides with references listed in APA style. Students will present their selected projects in class.

Peer Review of Philosophy Paper (30 each for a total of 60 pts) - Students will have the opportunity to work with a classmate throughout the class. Classmates will serve as the “official editors” of one another’s philosophy papers; as editors, you will be responsible for editing the first and final drafts of your partner’s philosophy paper. A rubric for the peer review process will be included in doc sharing. You may submit your philosophy of education to the Park University Online Writing Lab (OWL) to receive feedback on focus, development, organization, and mechanics by sending it to writinghelp@park.edu with the name of the course EDU 210 in the subject line. Expect a two working day turn-around time. 

Personal Philosophy Paper (110 pts)- The Personal Philosophy Paper is the core assessment for EDU 210. The formation of a philosophy of education is a developmental process shaped by our life’s experiences and education. Your beliefs about knowledge, where it comes from, and how you both learn and teach are already formed. This assignment is designed to facilitate your examination and expression of those beliefs by giving you the opportunity to journal on your learning as related to your beliefs. The total length of the paper should be approximately four to six typed pages (written for an audience of school administrators). A “Developing a Philosophy of Education” document and accompanying rubric will be included in doc sharing.

Final Exam -  Students may choose between one of four provided articles and reflect upon the article using a provided set of questions. (Provided by Instructor)

 

Grading:

 
   Opportunities for Extra Credit:
  1. Including n assigned Heading (10 extra pts)-The purpose of including an assigned heading is important for students to organize and save time.
  2.   Current event pertaining to education-(up to 10 points). Each student will select a current event  to discuss in class or copy of a “news” story regarding an issue related to one of the educational topics we will discuss during the course of our sixteen weeks together. In addition to providing a the story, the relevance to our course needs to be established and a link to either or our texts including page numbers of relevant information and sources.

Points Each

Total Points

%

Assignment

Total

Weekly discussion questions

6

48

9%

Weekly Chapter Reviews and/or Current Events

4

48

9%

Weekly posting for “Lessons Learned”

8

64

12%

Bi-Weekly quizzes

4

80

15%

Philosophy of Education Outline

28

28

5%

Mid-term reflection

45

45

9%

Peer review of Philosophy of Education

30

60

11%

Philosophy of Education

110

110

21%

Final

45

45

9%

Grand Total

  528

100%

Final Grade

Please read this carefully. There are a total of 528 points possible for the course and 26 extra credit points. Scores that end .5 or higher will be rounded up. Following are the percentage of points/letter grade scale.

90-100% = A
80-89.9% = B
70-79.9% = C
60-69.9% = D
59.9% and below = F

Late Submission of Course Materials:


All assignments are to be submitted in class as indicated in the assignment. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the professor prior to due date of an assignment if clarification is needed regarding criteria for the assignment. Students must demonstrate responsibility by following the criteria outlined and abide by the due dates for each project.  Late assignments will not be accepted unless an emergency situation arises and the professor is notified prior to the due date. Note: Students must recognize that technology can cause problems. Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead, keeping back-up copies of all assignments, and meeting deadlines without using technology as an excuse for failing to do so. In other words, it is advisable not to “wait until the last minute” and then for some unforeseen reason, not be able to submit an assignment on time. Please pace yourself and plan ahead.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Students are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner and in accordance with the policies on appropriate conduct as defined in the student handbook. Rules of netiquette must be followed. See Help and Resources or http://www.albion.com/netiquette/core rules.html  for more information.
EDU210 will often hold discussions that require students to be civil to each other when viewpoints differ on topics. As a professional certification class, students should conduct themselves as such when discussion and debates are part of class participation. See course guide for additional classroom requirements.
 
Note: Please do not use your technology devices in class (this includes cell phones talking and texting, head phones and personal computer). NO-- iPhones, iPads, or iPods. Thanks.
 
If you need to discuss an assignment, have an emergency or problems please call me at 816-584-6789 during office hours or 816-429-5297 (home). Make sure you get assistance prior to the assignment due date. If you have computer-related issues and need assistance beyond your understanding, seek the help desk here at Park University. There are computer labs to complete and print assignments in most buildings at Park University. Ask your instructor for assistance in locating a computer lab prior to due date of assignment. 
 
 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

   

Weeks (Tuesday - Thursday (This is a tentative schedule- there may be changes)

Dates

Topics

Assignments

1

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview; or listen to the audio.
  • View each of the four parts for the video, “The Common School” from the PBS Film Series: Video 1770-1890

Read School, The Story of American Public Education, p. 1-60.

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

T   01/15/13

TH   01/17/13

Expectations/Syllabus

 

Principals of Learning and Teaching

 

Introductions

Goals and Themes of the Edition

 Foliotek

 

Activities/Projects/Research and Assessments Discussed

 (Philosophy of Education)

Read Part 1 (Understanding the Teaching Profession)

Film

-Assign Chapters for Whole Class Review (Individual)

-Assign Groups for Group projects

-Assign Research presentation (Individual)

Essays, Test and Quizzes

Read-- Becoming a Teacher & Effective Teaching—Complete Terms

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic. Or, listen to the audio.
  • View each of the four parts for the video, “The An American as Public School: 1900-1950
  • ” from the PBS Film Series: Video 1900-1950
  • Read School, The Story of American Public Education, p. 63-119.
  • Read the materials related to the Philosophy of Education: description of the final project and rubric, completing an outline, and peer review process.

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

 T 01/22/13

TH 01/24/13

Is Teaching a Profession?

 

*Discussion on Becoming a Teacher, Effective Teaching— and Terms

 

Outline of Philosophy

 

Activities

E-Entry Due on 1/24 by 5:00 pm

Read –Student Diversity

3

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic; or listen to the audio.
  • View each of the four parts of the video, “A Struggle for Educational Equality: 1950-1980” from the PBS Film Series: Video 1950-1980
  • Read School, The Story of American Public Education, p. 214-170.
  • Bring two copies of your philosophy of education to Class
  • Edit your peer’s Philosophy of Education using the Peer Review form

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

T 01/29/13

Th 01/31/13

Read Part 2 (Historical and Philosophical Foundations)

 

*Discussion on Student Diversity

 

Philosophy and Editing

Chapters 1 and 2

Chapters 3 and 4

 

02/05/13Due  (5:00 pm)

Th * Quiz 1

 

Read –What are Schools For? and Life in Schools

4

T 02/05/13

Th 02/07/13

*Debates—Current Events

 

1.      Mega Safety Technology and Devices in Pre-Schools, Elementary, Middle and High Schools VS Keeping Schools the way they are?

2.      Teachers should join the AFT—Teachers should join the NEA

What did you learn from the Current Event Debates?

Group Debate Research—

02/07/13

Due  (5:00 pm) E-Entry #2

Chapters 5 and 6

5

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic; or listen to the audio.
  • View each of 4 segments of PBS video The Bottom Line in Education: 1980 to the Present.
  • Read School: The Story of American Public Education, Part Four Introduction (p. 173-182) and A Nation at Risk (p. 183-213).
  • Read Foundations of Education p. 425-427 (A Nation at Risk).
  • Read “Description of Mid-Term Activity” and complete one of the choices.

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

T  02/12/13

Th 02/14/13

Chapter Overviews

Read Part Three (Political, Economic and Legal Foundations)

Discuss Exam #1

 

Individual Presentations/Research

Individual Presentations and Handouts

Due  (500 pm)

Th *Quiz 2

 

Read-Controversy Over Who Controls the Curriculum

6

T 02/19/13

Th 02/21/13

Chapters Overview

*Discuss- Controversy Over Who Controls the Curriculum

Th Edit Exam #1

Due  (5:00 pm)

Entry #3

Due  (5:00 pm) Edited Exam #1

Chapters 7 & 8

7

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic, or listen to the audio.
  • Read Foundations of Education, Chapter 7-Governing and Administering Public Education and pages 297-298 on the topic of religion in schools.
  • Become familiar with the following website and the information it offers: http://www.schooldatadirect.org/
  • Review the document “US System of Education.”
  • Read the “History of the US Department of Education.” (Rampp, Guffey, Guffey, M. K. (1998)

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

  • Continue to develop and edit your Philosophy of Education

Edit your peer’s Philosophy of Education (30 pts)

T 02/26/13

Th 02/28/13

Read Part Four (Social Foundations)

Chapter 12 & 16

Due (500 pm)

 *Quiz 3

8

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic, or listen to the audio.
  • Read Foundations of Education, Chapters 8 (Financing Public Education) and 9 (Legal Aspects of Education). Also, review pages 130-131, Significant Events in the History of American Education, noting the relationship between major political events and significant educational events.

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

T 03/05/13

Th 03/07/13

Midterm—  (In Class-Presentation)

Edit-Exam 2 (In Class)

Chapter 10

Due (5:00 pm) E-Entry #4

Read—The Struggle for Equal Educational Opportunity

9

03/11/13

Spring Break

No Classes

10

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic, or listen to the audio.
  • Read Foundations of Education, Chapter 12 (Providing Equal Educational Opportunity) and Chapter 16 (School Effectiveness and Reform in the United States). Also read p. 291 (Home schooling); p. 220, & 523 (Charter Schools); and p. 249 (last paragraph & 250), 252-253, 523 (Vouchers); and note 524-525 (Controversy about School Choice)
  • Read “Comprehensive School Reform.”
  • Review the documents in the text and assigned readings. and become familiar with the pros and cons of school vouchers, charter schools, and homeschooling.

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

T 03/19/13

Th 03/21/13

Activities

*Discuss- The Struggle for Equal Educational Opportunity

Read Part Five (Curriculum Foundations)

Chapter 11

Due O3/21/13 (5:00 pm) E-Entry #5

11

T 03/26/13

Th 03/28/13

Complete Teaching Modules in Groups- Project

Chapter 12

Prospectus of Final Project (MUST BE APPROVED BY THIS DATE)

Due (5:00 pm) E-Entry #6

12

  • Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topic, or listen to the audio.
  • Read Foundations of Education, Chapter 13-The Changing Purposes of Education and pages pertaining to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) that can be located on page 550 of the Index especially pages 3-4. 22-25, 228, 249, 383-387, 421-422

(Chapters are assigned by Instructor)

T 04/02/13

Th 04/04/13

Read Part Six (Effective: International and American Perspectives)

Due

(500 pm)

*Quiz 4

13

T 04/09/13

Th 04/11/13

Debates—School Reform

No Child Left Behind

Obama’s Blue Print

Chapter 12 & 16

Philosophy of Ed. (Submitted)

Due by

14

T 04/16/13

Th 04/18/13

Final Presentations

All Research Papers Due

15

T 04/23/13

Th 04/25/13

Final Presentations

Due 11/24 (5:00 pm) Edited Exam #2

16

T 04/30/13

Th 05/01/13

Final Presentations

Final (Use Article for Exam)

17

T 05/07/13

Finals Week

 

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
Students learn from readings, lecture, peers, university research and community role models. While a sense of community begins at the cohort level, throughout one's college education it expands to include a global focus. Park offers its students a unique opportunity to practice that global focus through interaction with students from many nations, and each student should take advantage of that opportunity. Regardless of the course topic, critical thinking remains crucial to all classroom procedures. Thus, students will be asked to summarize what they read and hear, synthesize information from a number of sources, interact with one another in expressing conclusions, and formulate written responses. Alternate opinions and points of view will be respected and invited, and critical thinking will always be expected.

ASSIGNMENTS, EVALUATION PROCEDURES, AND GRADING POLICY


Link to Conceptual Framework: The focus of this course is to explore critical and contemporary issues in education. The overall evaluation of this course is structured around the completion of papers, group assignments, and two examinations. At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a competent level of being decision makers: demonstrating knowledge and skills when making decisions (all Assignments), being adaptive: demonstrating flexibility and strategic planning appropriate to a wide variety of learners for effective (Assignments 3, 5, 6, 7, 8), demonstrating collaboration: developing skills to work effectively with various stakeholders involved in the educational process (Assignments 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8), being culturally sensitive: by developing awareness and understanding of individual and group differences (all Assignments), being empathetic: by developing a sensitivity for individual, family, and institutional needs (all Assignments), being knowledgeable: demonstrating general knowledge relative to professional education (all Assignments) and being reflective: demonstrating critical thinking skills in the educational environment (all Assignments).


Assignments:


1. Paper: What does it mean to be a teacher? What is a good teacher? From you own experiences describe those elements that are essential to good teaching. The paper should be two pages, double-spaced, and word processed. The paper is due the second class meeting. Students will share their papers in small groups in class and the professor will read and grade them.


Course Objective 4


2. Paper: What is your philosophy of teaching? Your paper should include references to the reading in your textbook and information disseminated in class. The paper should be 3-5 pages long, double-spaced, word processed, and APA Style. The paper is due the fourth class meeting. Papers will be discussed with peers during class and will be graded by the professor.


Course Objective 5


3. Group presentation: The class will be divided, for this activity, into groups of 2-3. Each group will prepare an 8-10 minute presentation on an assigned legal or ethical issue or a significant court case and lead a class discussion of 5-10 minutes on the significance of the event. There should be clear evidence that everyone in the group participated in the preparation and delivery of the presentation and discussion. The presentations will be during the 11th class meeting. The professor will give a grade to each member of the group. 


Core Learning Outcomes 3,4


4. Group presentation: The class will be divided, for this assignment, into groups of 5-6. Each group will be assigned one of four Teaching Models to create a lesson plan. Students should prepare a 15 minute presentation on the Teaching Model using PowerPoint or video; then lead the class in a 15 minute discussion on the content of the lesson. There should be clear evidence that all group members participate in the presentation and/or following discussion. (See Course guide for presentation dates) The professor will give a grade to each member of the group. 


Core Learning Outcomes 1-6


5. Reaction to the video and discussion: Each student will write a minimum one-page, double-spaced, word processed paper reacting to videos and discussions for each week, Each student will also complete a viewing guide. Viewing guides are due at the end of the sixth class and the paper is due at the seventh class. The professor will grade both.


Core Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4


6. Research and report of selected Hall of Fame person- project:  students will be given a handout describing the Hall of Fame research requirement. Students will need to record information about their project and reflect on their experiences relating to the select researched person and educational theory. Each student will write a 4-5 page paper, double-spaced and word processed. The professor will grade the paper. 


Core Learning Outcomes 2, 3, 4


7.   There will be 4 quizzes and two exams. The specific data to be addressed on the examinations will be reviewed in class. The professor will grade the test. 


Core Learning Outcomes 1-6


8. There will be a final examination which will cover data addressed since the midterm. Specifics will be discussed in class. The professor will grade the test. 


Core Learning Outcomes 1-6



       
  1.  Class participation is an important part of the course. Your good attendance will assist in earning most of your points when you complete class activities and contribute in course discussions.


In most cases the professor will use rubrics for grading specific assignments, e.g., papers and group assignments.


 


 


 


 



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact examined and analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Developed a comprehensive synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 7 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Developed a synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 6 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact provided a discussion on the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Provided an essay on evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 5 or fewer  beliefs and less than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact presents ideas that are not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy.  Contains misuse of terms, which do not reflect mastery of sound educational theory or philosophy. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.  -The artifact or philosophy reflects exemplary insights of the writer's future within their chosen  professional field; students, who plan to teach, should write to their future as an educator. -The artifact moderately applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included  .-The artifact or philosophy reflects appropriate insights of the writer's future within their chosen  professional field. -The artifact minimally applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.  -The artifact or philosophy reflects little insight into  the writer's future within their chosen  professional field. Artifact presents confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow and lacks professional language. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   -For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.  -A minimum of 4 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -The artifact moderately provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   - For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.   -A minimum of 3 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -The artifact minimally artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   -For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.   -Less than 3 pages with several errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -Multiple incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included. Less than two pages with multiple errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling 
Competency Other Literacies (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.4.1; 1.2.2.1, 1.2.2,2, 1.2.2.3, 1.2.9.1, 1.2.9.2, 1.2.9.3, Conceptual Framework knowledge 1A, 1D, 3F, Skills 2A, 3C, Dispositions 3B, 3D, 4C, 2B, 2A, 5A                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Accurate presentation of 7 or more beliefs.  More than three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected philosopher (ies) or theorists.  Personal examples or insights are included.  Essay demonstrates a deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues and written in a professional style and unique or enticing organization.  Essay reflects insights of the writer's future as an educator.  Correct sentence structure, punctuation, and grammar.   Transitions create unified essay.  Minimum four pages.  Professional language/ No slang terms. Accurate presentation of 6 beliefs.  Three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected  philosopher(ies) or theorists.  Essay written in a professional style, with clear and correct terminology, and with logical organization.  Essay demonstrates a grasp of educational terminology, ideas, and issues.  Essay reflects insights of the writer's future as an educator.  Correct sentence structure that utilizes transitions.  Minimum three pages.    Professional language/no slang terms. Presentation of 5 or fewer beliefs.  Less than three beliefs are supported by philosophers(ies) or theorists.  Essay written in a casual style with unclear usage of terminology and some illogical organization.  Essay reflects little insight into the writer's future as an educator.  Some incorrect sentence structures, spelling, and/or grammar exhibited.  More transitions are needed.  Less than three pages.  Weak professional language and/or contains a slang term. Essay is a rambling of ideas not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy.  Several incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included.   Choppy and confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow.  Less than two pages.  Lacks professional language and contains slang terms. 
Competency Other Literacies (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.11.1 Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 2D, Skills 2F, 3A; Dispositions 2D                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included; Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” Two or more examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system.. In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included.  Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts”.  One example of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system    









 
In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included. Essay weakly defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system









 
In portfolio document, missing artifact and its application to this indicator.  No introductory sentence on electronic portfolio development, and several mistakes in sentence structure, grammar. 

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Last Updated:1/7/2013 11:46:57 AM