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CA 490D Professional Learning ExperienceOrganizational Communication
Staff


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

ONLINE CA 490 Professional Learning ExperienceOrganizational Communication

Semester

S1T 2013 DL

Faculty

Dr. Joan E. Aitken

Title

Professor, Arts and Communication

Degrees/Certificates

Bachelors in Communication Theory
Masters in Speech; second Masters in Curriculum and Leadership
Doctorate in Higher Education and Communication

Office Location

None, distance faculty

Office Hours

By appointment

Other Phone

Phone number is in eCollege contact information, at the bottom of non-eCollege emails, and in http://people.park.edu

E-Mail

joan.aitken@park.edu

Web Page

tp://ourwayit.com/Guidelines.html

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

    Richmond, V. P., McCroskey, J. C., & McCroskey, L. L. (2013). Organizational communication for survival: Making work, work (5th ed.). Boston: Pearson. ISBN-10: 020506034X ISBN-13: 9780205060344

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Student's Responsibilities for Applied Work

This course is a unique application of college learning through paid or volunteer work. This pace explains choices and requirements.

Your Choice

IF YOU HAVE A JOB OR INTERNSHIP PROSPECT

  1. Arrange the time and date for the interview.

  2. Provide a copy of an application, resume, portfolio, and social security information to the employer during the prospective interview.

  3. Pass the interviewing/hiring process with the company--just like any other employee—and meet employment requirements. Give the employer your professor's contact information.

  4. Make the employer aware that the university will require an employee evaluation or letter of reference about you.

Your Choice

IF YOU ALREADY HAVE A JOB

  1. Inform your supervisor that you will be using your job as part of this course.

  2. Obtain your supervisor's agreement to provide you with an employee evaluation or letter of reference for the purpose of this course.

  3. Discuss with your supervisor any ideas you have to enhance your communication skills related to the job (e.g., create a media kit).

Your Choice

IF YOU DON'T HAVE A JOB

  1. Find an internship job.

  2. Find a non-profit company where you can volunteer your time.

  3. Meet with your volunteer coordinator or supervisor about this course and the requirement for an employee evaluation or letter of reference for the purpose of this course.

  4. Discuss with your supervisor any ideas you have to enhance your communication skills related to the job (e.g., create a media kit).

Your Choice

Internship Information for the Employer

This course is an opportunity for juniors and seniors to work in an area of communication, while receiving pay and college credit. As a guideline, three hours of credit translates to a minimum of 80 hours on the job during the term or semester.

Your Choice

Employer Responsibilities

  • Provide a part-time or full- time employment to a student. The employment may be with the intention of being temporary or permanent.

  • The employment needs to be appropriate for the student to learn career skills. Using a student to make copies, wash the van, or similar activities is not appropriate for a student who is soon to be a college graduate on a professional career path.

  • Provide mentoring and guidance to the student.

  • Complete a letter of reference or supervisor work evaluation on the student (week 6 in 8 week course and week 12 for 16 week course).

Your Choice

Student Responsibilities

  • Provide consistent, quality work approximately 80 hours for the company or nonprofit organization according to a schedule arranged between the student and the company, which meets the same standards and expectations of regular employees.

  • Use professionalism on the job by arriving to work early each day, notifying your supervisor of an absence in advance, having near perfect attendance, showing initiative, completing all assigned tasks, following the chain of command, being respectful toward all workers and customers, and other job-specific requirements.

  • Keep a journal, which includes a record of the daily hours and job responsibilities, which is submitted to the faculty contact AND answers to questions based on the course textbook.

  • Obtain a letter of reference from the employer or coworker, which you submit in your portfolio.

  • Complete the core assessment required by the Department.

  • Complete the final exam based on the textbook content and your work experience.

Park’s University’s Career Develop Staff is amazing, and they will give students at a distance ideas about finding a job, volunteer work, or internship. Both Layne Prenger, the Director, and Traci Klasing, Assistant Director, who is in charge of internships—have helped our students. See http://www.park.edu/career/

Layne (816) 584-6350
email:
layne.prenger@park.edu
Traci (816) 584-6407
email:
traci.klasing@park.edu
FAX (816) 505-5445
Online Chat through MyPark
Wednesdays 5:30 - 9:00 PM
CST

This course moves very quickly, so contact them immediately if you need help in finding a placement.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
CA490D Organizatinal Communication - Students gain extensive experience in organizational settings including social seervices agencies, nonprofit companies, government and corporate environments. Variable credit: 3 to 6 hours.

Educational Philosophy:

This course seeks to be a useful one for your work and application of learning. Students are expected to work each week toward completing the Core Assessment throughout the course and not wait until the last minute to begin that assignment.

Your professor reserves the right to make course updates, changes, corrections, and adaptations to meet the needs of currently enrolled students and the present context. This includes changes to the assignments and grading.

Class Assessment:

WEIGHT OF ASSIGNMENTS

  • 10 points--Resume and portfolio for job interview (due week 1). 10%
  • 20 points--Core Assessment a--due week 6. Include daily/weekly journal entries, time sheets, examples of work produced.
  • 10 points--copy of supervisor's evaluation or letter of reference (due week 6-8).
  • 42 points (7 weeks at 6 points each).--Weekly update to professor, postings or essay about textbook readings 42%
  • Proctored final exam (18%)

GRADING SCALE

100 points = 100% of the course grade.

90-100 points A

80-89,9 points B

70-70.9 points C

60-69.9 points D

ASSIGNMENTS AND RUBRICS

CAREER PORTFOLIO

Prepare a professional portfolio you can use in your job hunting. You may use one you prepared in another class to start or you may have to create something new. To start, at a minimum you need a resume and a separate page of references (make sure you gained their permission first) with contact information.

By the end of the course, your portfolio should contain some examples of your work from this course, other courses, and your work or volunteer experience.

The grading is highly individualistic because different students are at different places in their development during this course.

There are excellent rubric examples on the Internet. If these links don't work, simply search for your own, and you will gain many ideas about possible assessment.

Please compare your portfolio to the following:

http://www.ccd.me.edu/careerprep/Career_portfolio_rubrics.pdf 

http://www.champaignschools.org/ecp/assignments/Career%20Portfolio%20Rubric.pdf 


WEEKLY ESSAY OR DISCUSSION BOARD

If you are in a small enrollment, independent study section, your professor may want to to only submit an essay to the dropbox. If you are in a larger class that conducts weekly discussion, please interact with other students about each chapter in the weekly discussion board.


WEEKLY ESSAYS

If there are more than 8 students in the course, the essays will go in the discussion board each week.

If there are fewer than 9 students in the course, students will write weekly essays to post in the Weekly Assignments dropbox AND include these weekly essays in your core assessment due week 6.

Instructions: Write an essay about a chapter concept. You will have a total of 15 essays for chapters 1 through 15. Each chapter's essay need to be approximately 250 words or one double spaced page.


ESSAY GRADING RUBRIC

Mastery 6 points--"A" (6% of final course grade)--Meets all objectives.

Basic Standards 5 points--"B"--Missing one objective.

Developing Standards 4 points--"D"--Missing two objectives.

Note, your instructor may deductive one point for each missing essay.

Objectives:

1. Clearly apply principles from readings to the student's paid or volunteer work context. Applies principles of effective organizational communication, including self-analysis.

2. Use stories, examples, and explanation to show understanding of the assigned readings.

3. Avoid mentioning the names of people and organization.

4. Write well (e.g., use essay format, use formal academic style, no abbreviations, no distracting errors, APA style where needed).

5. One essay for each assigned chapter for the week.

6. Each chapter's essay about 250 words (comparable to 1 double spaced, typed page)

2. Writes about information from each chapter.

3. Applies chapter content to the students current work or volunteer context.

4. Contains substantive content.

5. Demonstrates effective communication and writing (e.g., formal style, ).


WEEK DISCUSSION BOARD GRADING RUBRIC

Mastery 6 points--"A" (6% of final course grade)--Meets all objectives.

Basic Standards 5 points--"B"--Missing one objective.

Developing Standards 4 points--"D"--Missing two objectives.

Note, your instructor may deductive one point for each missing essay.

Objectives:

1. Contributes to all required threads regarding each assigned chapter.

2. Interacts in conversation with other students.

3. Demonstrates knowledge of week's chapters.

4. Writes about information from each chapter.

5. Applies chapter content to the students current work or volunteer context.

6. Contains substantive content.

7. Demonstrates effective communication and writing (e.g., formal style, no abbreviations, no distracting errors, APA style where needed).


CORE ASSESSMENT

Instructions: Prepare an extensive document supporting your learning in this course as applied to a work or volunteer experience.

Core Assessment Grading Rubric

Mastery--All 7 objectives met (18-20 points)

Nearing Mastery--6 objectives met (16-17 points)

Basic Standards--5 objectives met (14-15 points)

20 points--Core Assessment a--due week 6.

1. Record daily/weekly journal entries about professional learning experience.

2. Keep accurate time sheets or a professional learning experience totaling about 80 hours.

3. Demonstrate quality of work through examples of work produced.

4. Write and include the 15 weekly essays, one for each chapter, which apply the learned principles to the student's professional learning experience.

5. Write using a professional style, with substantive content. Length should be about 20 pages.

6. Employ professional level organizational communication.

7. Include a self-analysis based on ALL measures provided in the weekly course lectures.


FINAL EXAM

You must submit a proctor for your final exam by Friday of week 6. It is extremely important that you comply with Park University policy on this requirement. Read the rules and instructions regarding proctored exams at http://www.park.edu/online/proctoredform.asp?s=&c=online . It is your responsibility to follow the instructions to arrange a proctor for your final exam. You cannot pass the course if you fail to take the proctored final exam!

The final exam will be a brief, objective style test over the course textbook. The exam should take you less than a half hour. Study the weekly chapter reading lectures to prepare for the test.

Grading:

 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Be on time.
http://ourwayit.com/Guidelines.html#BE_ON_TIME 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Employ professionalism toward your work and the course.
http://ourwayit.com/Guidelines.html

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

Your professor has the option to change this schedule during the term according to circumstances and learning needs of individual students, technical problems, new ideas, and other reasons. Here is the schedule planned for this term.

Week

Objectives

Readings and Discussion/Essays

FOR EACH CHAPTER--Discussion Board or post a 200-300 word essay each week about one of the chapter topic listed below for each chapter.

Professional Experience Assignments

All Assignments due by Sunday, 11:59 PM Central Time

1

  1. To begin work in a volunteer or paid context so that you can apply communication principles that make work effective.

  2. To prepare a context where you can employ research-based communication for effective work in an organization.

  3. To describe the nature of the organization where you work or volunteer.

  4. To explain your communication strategies where you work or volunteer.

Chapter 1. The Nature of Organizations.

  • Types of Organizations.

  • Common Characteristics of All Organizations.

  • Organizational Environments.

  • Preliminary Principles for Peons.

  • Viewing Organizations.

Chapter 2. The Nature of Communication in Organizations

  • Myths and Misconceptions about Communication in Organizations.

  • Organizational Communication Defined.

  • Components of Communication.

  • Functions of Communication in Organizations.

  • Organizational Communication Networks.

  • Formal Communication Flow and Impact.

Prepare employee portfolio: Upload your portfolio to the e-course dropbox, and take your portfolio for your current supervisor's review (if you are currently employed), to your internship interview, or to a job interview.

Complete any contractual paperwork for your volunteer or paid job placement.

Begin work as soon as possible (e.g., current employment, internship, or volunteer work for a nonprofit organization).

Keep journal that contains your exact work hours, tasks assigned and completed, and reactions to your work for this week.

2

To finalize your volunteer or paid work placement for the course.

To implement research-based nonverbal communication strategies for effectiveness.

To evaluate research-based communication strategies for effectiveness with supervisors and administrators.

To find ways to reduce barriers to effective communication.

To begin work in a volunteer or paid context so that you can apply communication principles that make work effective.

Chapter 3. Nonverbal Behavior and Communication.

  • Significance of Nonverbal Communication in Organizations.

  • Functions of Nonverbal Messages.

  • Categories of Nonverbal Messages.

  • Immediacy and Organizational Communication.

Chapter 4. Administration, Supervision, and Communication.

  • Supervisors' Duties: Subordinates' Views.

  • Why Aren't Managers Doing Their Jobs?

  • To Supervise or to Administer? That Is the Question.

  • What Kind of Manager Do You Have?

Chapter 5. Barriers to Effective Communication.

  • Climate Control.

  • Status.

  • Communication Overload.

  • Handling Overload

  • Defensiveness.

 

In dropbox, make sure you have submitted all information related to your paid or volunteer work placement.
Keep journal that contains your exact work hours, tasks assigned and completed, and reactions to your work for this week.

 

Continue work at a volunteer nonprofit organization or paid internship.

3

To self evaluate your personality, temperament, and communication traits regarding work.

Chapter 6. Personality, Temperament, and Communication Traits.

  • Personality and Temperament.

  • Temperamentality/Personality and Communication.

  • Communication Traits.

  • Sociocommunication Orientations and Styles.

 

Keep journal that contains your exact work hours, tasks assigned and completed, and reactions to your work for this week.

Complete all measures in the week's lecture. Write an analysis of the results for your journal (core assessment)

 

Continue work at a volunteer nonprofit organization or paid internship.

 

4

To find communication behaviors appropriate for your organization's orientation.

To employ communication strategies that increase your credibility and interpersonal attractiveness.

As a subordinate, to evaluate communication strategies effective with management. Use communication strategies that are respectful to people with power or status.

Chapter 7. Organizational Orientations and Communication Traits.

  • Organizational Orientations.

  • Personality Types.

  • Organizational Orientations and Temperament.

  • Organizational Orientations, Temperament, and Organizational Outcomes.

Chapter 8. Perceptions of People in Organizations.

  • Source Credibility.

  • Interpersonal Attractiveness.

  • Homophily.

Chapter 9. Approaches to Management.

  • Early Orientations.

  • Leadership Approaches.

  • The Ideal Leader?

  • Management Communication Styles and Decision-Making.

  • Decision-Making and Communication

  • Why Managers Select One MCS over Another.

  • Identifying the MCS.

 

Keep journal that contains your exact work hours, tasks assigned and completed, and reactions to your work for this week.

5

 

Chapter 11. Organizational Culture.

  • Defining Culture.

  • Culture and Communication.

  • Cultural Terminology.

  • Organizations and Cultures.

  • Ethnocentrism.

Chapter 12. Communication and Change.

  • Why People Resist Change in Organizations.

  • Informal Communication Network Roles.

  • Innovativeness: The Willingness to Adopt.

  • Introducing Change.

  • Stages of the Adoption Process.

  • Characteristics or Attributes of Innovations.

  • Six Conditions Necessary for Successful Change.

Keep journal that contains your exact work hours, tasks assigned and completed, and reactions to your work for this week.

Update your portfolio with materials from your professional learning experience.

Continue work at a volunteer nonprofit organization or paid internship.

 

Start pulling everything together for your course core assessment.

 

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you submit a proctor request.

6

To synthesize coursework so far.

To implement communication strategies that manage conflict.

 

Chapter 13. Disagreement, Conflict, and Groupthink. .

  • Disagreement and Conflict.

  • Tolerance for Disagreement.

  • Conflict Prevention.

  • Conflict Management.

  • Groupthink: Too Much Agreement for the Good of the Organization.

 

Finish journal that contains your exact work hours, tasks assigned and completed, and reactions to your work for this week.

Submit core assessment in Dropbox: Core Assessment --due. Include daily/weekly journal entries, time sheets, examples of work produced, weekly essays/postings about how you applied the readings, and a copy of supervisor's evaluation or letter of reference (due week 6).

If you plan to extend your work experience, you need to submit a completed form for incomplete in the dropbox week 6.

Continue work at a volunteer nonprofit organization or paid internship.

7

To participate in an employee evaluation of your work performance.

As a subordinate, to develop a positive relationship with the supervisor.

To evaluate discrimination and pseudo discrimination practices.

 

Chapter 14. Effective Supervisory and Subordinate Relationships.

  • Read Why Some Do Not Survive: Ten Common Communication Mistakes.

  • How to Survive: Common Communication Strategies for Survival.

Chapter 15. Discrimination and Pseudo Discrimination. The Need for Discrimination.

  • The Evils of Discrimination.

  • Making Evaluations Work (for you).

  • Staying out of Trouble: The Peon Perspective.

  • Dealing with Pseudo Discrimination and Diversity.

 

Finish your work at a volunteer nonprofit organization or paid internship.

Obtain a supervisor evaluation or reference.

 

Begin studying for proctored final exam.

8

To synthesize coursework so far.

Chapter 16. When All Else Fails? Get Out.

 

Wednesday--Final date to submit revised Core Assessment in dropbox.

 

Wednesday--Final date to submit a copy of supervisor's evaluation or letter of reference in the dropbox.

 

Friday—Final date to submit proctored final exam.

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course related question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

COURSE ACCESS

If you are viewing this announcement in the electronic course (eCollege), you found it! If you received this announcement by email, you will be able to access the course in advance of the start date here:
https://secure.ecollege.com/parku/index.learn?action=welcome  You may want to buy the book and look at course materials early so you will be ready to start on the first day of the term.


ONLINE COURSE PROBLEMS

If you have a question more technical in nature about the online course, please contact Park's eCollege (Pearson) Helpdesk (not your professor). They will walk you through a solution. Chat
http://247support.custhelp.com/  and select the "Chat" tab in upper right of screen. Or call 1-866-301-7275 or 877.740.2213. Help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.



MYPARK RELATED PROBLEMS

If you have forgotten your Student ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 1-800-927-3024. The helpdesk hours are 8-5 Central Time Mon-Fri.



START AND END DATE

See
http://www.park.edu/acadcalendar/  Your professor will join the course on the start date.


FACULTY AND STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION

See
http://people.park.edu 

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and cannot be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:12/13/2012 1:18:49 PM