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HIS 104 American History Survey Throughthe Civil War
Toro, Paul R.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

HIS 104 American History Survey Throughthe Civil War

Semester

S1T 2013 DLA

Faculty

Toro, Paul R.

Title

Senior Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

BS USAFA
MA Norwitch

Office Location

San Antonio

Office Hours

12:00 - 2:00 M-F San Antonio time

Daytime Phone

210 732 7479

E-Mail

paul.toro@park.edu

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Robert A. Divine, T. H. Breen, George M. Fredrickson, R. Hal Williams, Ariela J. Gross, H.W. Brands, and Randy Roberts. America: Past & Present, 8th Brief Edition, Combined Volume. (New York: Pearson/Longman, 2011). ISBN: 978-0-205-76041-1.

Additional Resources:
 

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
HIU 104 American History Survey Through the Civil War: LE - Introduction to the social, cultural, political and economic history of the United States from the conquest and colonization of North America to the reunification of the nation at the conclusion of the Civil War. The survey shall comprise and inquiry of period literature. (United States Concentration) Offered as required. 3:0:3

  Instructor Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate critically diverse interpretations of historical developments.
  2. Assess the diversity of native and immigrant cultural values, gender, race, and class differences as a national foundation.
  3. Evaluate how present-day situations have grown out of past events, such as the interaction with Native Americans, the Puritan work ethic, the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, the Civil War, slavery, abolitionism, immigration, industrialization, and manifest destiny, which are essential for participation in America's democratic experiment.
  4. Examine roles of key individuals, groups, and ideas in historical context.
  5. Contrast regional and local historical events within national issues and events.
  6. Critique how and why the historical interpretations regarding controversies, issues, personalities, and problems have changed over time.
  7. Describe the ways geography has impacted historical processes.
  8. Differentiate between primary and secondary sources.
  9. Identify political ideologies fomenting the foundations of global and American actions
  10. Apply critical reading, thinking, writing, research, and discussion skills.
Class Assessment:
 

Each student is responsible for completing the following assignments:

Weekly Discussions: Your comments in discussion should be written in your own words. To support your comments you may use brief quotations from our textbooks or other scholarly sources; however, you must properly document all borrowed material. If you cite our textbooks, a parenthetical citation with the author's name and page number is sufficient. If you use an outside source, please provide a full citation. If you use a quotation from any source, you must use quotation marks. There are two discussion topics each week, worth 10-points each, for a total of 20 discussion points.

Discussion Grading Rubric: Early in the week, post your main response to the question in each discussion topic. Each week there are at least two topics, you must post one main response and two peer response comments in each topic. Your responses will be graded on the following criteria:

Length of 2 main posts: minimum of 100 words on the initial discussion response: 1 point each main post, (2 points possible each week)

Conventions (grammar/punctuation/spelling/and citation if needed): 1 point overall on each topic, (2 points possible each week).

Content (relevant to the discussion question): 4 points overall in each topic, (8 points possible each week).

Peer Responses: in each topic, post two separate Peer Responses consisting of thoughtful and detailed comments: 2 points each for a total possible of 8 points possible each week

Total Possible on each week's discussion: 20 points overall, (10 points in each topic)

Journals: Students will be required to write four journals (Weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6) based on various topics as indicated. The Journal assignment will be placed in the JOURNAL tab at the top of your eCollege course platform.

 

Journal Rubric

0

1

2

3

Score Received

Student demonstrated no awareness of the context surrounding the journal question.

Student demonstrated an awareness of the context surrounding the journal question but did not explore it.

Student demonstrated an awareness of the context surrounding the journal question and made minimal comment.

Student demonstrated a high awareness of the context surrounding the journal question.

Analysis conveyed no personal response to the journal question.

Analysis conveyed little evidence of a personal response to the journal question.

Analysis conveyed some evidence of a personal response to the journal question.

Analysis conveyed evidence of a personal response to the journal question.

Student demonstrated that he/she reflected new interpretations of evidence.

Student demonstrated no evidence of command of the English language.

Student demonstrated some evidence of command of the English language.

Student demonstrated a good command of the English language.

Student demonstrated an excellent command of the English language.

Student demonstrated no ability to reflect on own work.

Student demonstrated some ability to reflect on own work but does not provide many examples.

Student demonstrated an ability to reflect on own work but examples provided were minimal.

Student demonstrated an ability to reflect on own work. Provided examples consistently.

Student demonstrated no comprehension of the journal question.

Student demonstrated some basic comprehension of the journal question.

Student comprehended the surface level meaning of the journal question.

Student was able to make inferences and comprehended deeper meaning.

Journal was 149 words or less.

Journal was 150-175 words.

Journal was 175-200 words.

Journal was proper length of 200 words.

Journal had 5 or more spelling and/or grammar errors.

Journal had 3-4 spelling and/or grammar errors.

Journal had 1-2 spelling and/or grammar errors.

Journal had no spelling and/or grammar errors.

Student developed and expressed no argument, opinion, or response to the journal question.

Student developed and expressed only one argument, opinion, and response to the journal question.

Student developed and expressed only two arguments, opinions, and responses to the journal question.

Student developed and expressed three or more arguments, opinions, and responses to the journal question.

_____/27

INSTRUCTOR

PERSPECTIVE

_____/23

TOTAL POINTS

_____/50

Exams: There are two exams in this course: a Midterm and a Proctored Final Exam. There are study guides in the course along with areas in the Instructor's Office for discussion of the material.

Midterm Exam Grading: The 100-point matching and multiple-choice midterm exam covers Weeks 1-4, chapters 1-7. You will have 1 hour and 30 minutes to complete the exam – you must finish it once you have started. You will not be able to save it and return later. It is open-book, open-note.

Proctored Final Exam Grading: The 100-point proctored matching and multiple-choice final exam is the Core Assessment for this course. It is comprehensive, covering materials from Week 1-8, chapters 1-15. This exam is NOT open-book or open-not.  

For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. You will also need to check with your proctor to see if they will need for you to bring paper to the exam since this is a short answer and essay exam. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

*    It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.

*    Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.

*    A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.

*    Final Exams cannot be taken before Monday of Week 8. Request for a waiver from                                         this time restriction must be submitted directly to Dr. Tim Westcott, Chair of the Department of Culture and Society at: tim.westcott@park.edu. Requests must be made at least seven working days prior the commencement of Week 8.

Proctored Final Examination Policies:

-- Examinations must account for no less than 20% and no more than 30% of students’ final grade.

-- Examinations are to be completed in a 2-hour testing session.

Failure to Take a Final Examination:

-- Failure to take a proctored final examination will result in an automatic “F” for the course. As the final examination is a required course component, the grade of “F” must be recorded regardless of the student’s grade before the examination (or what the student’s grade would be if points from the final exam were deducted).

Grading:

Weekly Discussion Threads
160 Points Total
Journals (Weeks 2, 3, 5 and 6)
200 Points Total
Midterm Examination
(Week 4)
100 Points Total
Proctored Final Examination
(Week 8)
100 Points Total
 
560 Points Total for Course
 
 

Grading:

A. = exceptional and an uncommon achievement.

B. = is above the average performance of a 1st or 2nd year college student and is earned by exceeding the standard.

C. = is the average expected of a 1st or 2nd year student and is earned by meeting the standard.

D. = is below average and marginally meets the course standard.

F. = is obviously failing to meet the course standard.

Course Grading Scale:

A = 560.0-504.0 points

B = 503.9-447.9 points

C = 447.8-391.8 points

D = 391.7-335.7 points

F = 335.6 points or below

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

All work is due on the due date. If you will miss work and need to submit late (for TDY or emergency), make arrangements with the instructor ahead of time. Late work will be penalized 10 percent per day late unless prior arrangements have been made.

No work can be submitted after the last day of class.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

The fundamental objective of this course is to learn. That means we must all work together and learn from each other. In order to accomplish this, we must treat each other with respect. Everyone will have the opportunity and freedom to express their ideas. Be sure to review the Park Student Code of Conduct.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Weeks

Topics

Assignments

Week 1

New World Encounters

Read Chapter 1

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lecture 1 (PPT)

Week 2

17th & 18th Century America

Read Chapters 2, 3 and 4

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lectures 2, 3 and 4 (PPT)

Complete Journal assignment

Week 3

American Revolution, & Republican Culture

Read Chapters 5 and 6

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lectures 5 and 6 (PPT)

Complete Journal assignment

Week 4

Democracy in Distress, 1788-1800

Read Chapter 7

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lecture 7 (PPT)

Complete the Mid-Term Examination

Week 5

Jeffersonianism, Nationalism and Andrew Jackson

Read Chapters 8, 9 and 10

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lectures 8, 9 and 10 (PPT)

Complete Journal assignment

Week 6

Slavery and Perfectionism

Read Chapters 11 and 12

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lectures 11 and 12 (PPT)

Complete Journal assignment

Week 7

Expansionism and Sectionalism

Read Chapters 13 and 14

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lectures 13 and 14 (PPT)

Week 8

Secession & the Civil War

Read Chapter 15

Perform Discussion Threads

View Lecture 15 (PPT)

Complete Proctored Final Examination

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course related question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 


Online Course Policies:


Policy #1:  Submission of Work:


A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday 12:01 am MST and Sunday at 11:59 PM MST. The first week begins the first day of the term/semester. Assignments scheduled for completion during a class week should be completed and successfully submitted by the posted due date.


Create a back up file of every piece of work you submit for grading. This will ensure that a computer glitch or a glitch in cyberspace won't erase your efforts.


When files are sent attached to an email, the files should be in either Microsoft Word, RTF, ASCII, txt, or PDF file formats.


Policy #2: Ground Rules for Online Communication & Participation


General email: Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. When sending email other than assignments, you must identify yourself fully by name and class in all email sent to your instructor and/or other members of our class.


Online threaded discussions: are public messages and all writings in this area will be viewable by the entire class or assigned group members.


Online Instructor Response Policy:  Online Instructors will check email frequently and will respond to course-related questions within 24-48 hours.


Observation of "Netiquette": All your Online communications need to be composed with fairness, honesty and tact.  Spelling and grammar are very important in an Online course.  What you put into an Online course reflects on your level of professionalism.  Here are a couple of Online references that discuss writing Online http://goto.intwg.com/ and netiquette http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html.


Please check the Announcements area before you ask general course "housekeeping" questions (i.e. how do I submit assignment 3?).  If you don't see your question there, then please contact your instructor. 


Policy #3: What to do if you experience technical problems or have questions about the Online classroom.  


If you experience computer difficulties (need help downloading a browser or plug-in, you need help logging into the course, or if you experience any errors or problems while in your Online course, click on the  button in your Online Classroom, then click on the helpdesk menu item, and then fill out the form or call the helpdesk for assistance. 


If the issue is preventing you from submitting or completing any coursework, contact your instructor immediately.


Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright
                               and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:12/15/2012 10:24:15 AM