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AR 115 Introduction to the Visual Arts
Fontana, Leslie J.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

AR 115 Introduction to the Visual Arts

Semester

S2Z 2013 MLH

Blended Course     This is a blended course.  More details can be found under Blended Course Guidelines

Faculty

Fontana, Leslie J.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

BS Degree Elementary Education; K-12 Certification in Art; Western Montana College, 1976
Master of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Montana, 1997

Office Location

Office at home

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

406-727-4379

E-Mail

Leslie.Fontana@park.edu

Semester Dates

Mar 18 to May 10, 2013

Class Days

-M-W---

Class Time

7:45 - 10:15 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

The Art of Seeing; Zelanski & Fisher, Eighth Edition; Copyright 2011; Pearson Education, Inc; Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ ISBN 978-0-205-74834-1

The Annotated Mona Lisa; A Crash Course in Art History from Prehistoric to Modern Second Edition;  Copyright 2007 Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC, Kansas City, MO. ISBN=10: 0-8362-8005-9

Additional Resources:
 

Video Series Art of the Western World; Anneberg Media.  Available at McCaffee Memorial Library.

The Power Of Myth Video Series; Bill Moyers and Joseph Campbell: PBS Video; 1976

The Artchive Website

Various online resources including virtual gallery tours and examples of visual art

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
AR115 Introduction to the Visual Arts LE A basic art appreciation course which introduces the formal language of painting, sculpture and architecture, relating them to the philosophical premises and historical events that they reflect. This course provides a framework of reference for appreciation of art as well as a basis for further study. While slide-lecture is the usual format, demonstrations, field trips and gallery tours augment classroom instruction. 3:0:3. @

Blended Course Guidelines (Link to guidelines page) – A blended course must meet a minimum percentage of time in the classroom, as specified by University and department guidelines.

Educational Philosophy:
 

The Instructor's  educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, class discussions, videos, internet websites, and examples of visual art.  The instructor makes every attempt to keep the subject matter relevant to world history and current events.  This is a "blended" course, meaning 60% takes place face to face, and 40% occurs online. It is the philosophy of the instructor that the use of the internet for the teaching of Art History opens up unlimited resources in the form of Galleries, Video resources and art examples. Since this is a blended class, and much of the instruction takes place online, it is mandatory that students complete ALL of the reading.  Focus questions, guided reading lessons, and assignments will be completed within the course shell online.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Use the specialized vocabulary of art and design to describe, both orally and in writing, their responses to art they have directly experienced.
  2. Describe stylistic similarities and differences in art from a wide variety of cultures and time periods.
  3. Critically respond to works of art, e.g. (Students will be able to not only know what they “like” but why.)
  4. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the principal stylistic divisions in western art and of many world cultures.
  5. Experience art directly in available local museums, galleries and architectural sites as a basis for response and critique.
  6. Explain a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional studio techniques.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Experience art through the internet as a basis for response and critique
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of connections between art, other subject areas, and life
  3. Develop an awareness of the impact of art on individuals and society
  4. Analyze the elements of a variety of art genre.
Core Assessment:

 

A comprehensive final exam of 100 multiple choice questions derived from the first three exams. The majority of the questions are vocabulary or concept based. The exam is worth 100 points out of 500 points in the course (20%).

Class Assessment:
 

Coverage of the course topic will be accomplished in a variety of ways: Reading assignments, lecture, discussion, slide shows and videos.  Assessment will be based on midterm and final examinations,reflective essays (f tof), guided reading lessons (online), threaded discussions (online) If essays, reading lessons, and discussions as  means of review and assessing the material prove to be ineffective, a quiz of equal value will be substituted.  Additionally, participation points will be awarded for each class session.  A rubric identifying quality participation and guidelines for reflective writing are attached to this syllabus. 

Coverage of the course topic will be accomplished in a variety of ways: Reading assignments, lecture, both online and f to f, discussion, both verbal and as threaded discussions through the course shell on the Park Website, slide shows and videos, available online and through the course shell.  Assessment will be based on a midterm and final exam comprised of multiple choice. Identification of artworks,and essay question. Additionally, participation points will be awarded for each face to face and online class session.  A rubric identifying quality participation  both face to face and online is included here as an appendix

Grading:
 

Examinations: midterm exam                                                125 points

                        final exam                                                       125 points

 Online assignments  9 assignments @ 10 pts each:                90 points

 Face to face writing assignments @ 10 points each:              90 points

Participation points: 14 sessions @ 5 pts each    -                    70 pts  

Total points available:                                                            500 points 

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

Because this is a blended class, and assignments may be posted online, there is little tolerance for late assignments.  Students must post responses to weekly discussions initially by Tuesday, with responses to discussion postings occurring by Sunday of the week in question.  The flexibility is built into the class by the nature of an online class.  Students who miss f to f classes because of duty will be able to turn in assignments online.   In cases of true emergency, the student should contact the instructor by email or by phone to make arrangements for makeup.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

 Because this is a reading and discussion course, keeping up with the assigned reading and participating in class are critical to both the students understanding of the material and the grade.  Excused absences are only given in cases of duty assignments, verified  by the proper paperwork, or documented emergency. The instructor should be notified in advance of such absences.  In cases of unexcused absence, make up is at the discretion of the instructor.    Arriving late to class is both disruptive and rude.  Participation points will be deducted for coming late to class. Leaving class early is treated similarly to tardies, with participation points being deducted.

   Students who are also parents often have babysitting problems.  While I sympathize with the parent, I do not allow children in the classroom, so parents should have a backup plan for babysitting.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Week l; Session 1: Learning to See: The Art of Seeing Ch. 1 pp 11-53

Week l; Session 2: The Art of Seeing Ch. 2 pp 56-160 Visual Elements: Quiz

Mona pp I, II

Video

Week 2; Session 1: The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 427-439  Ancient Art

Mona pp 2-11 

Power of Myth

Week 2; Session 2: The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 440-442  Greece and Rome

Mona pp
 12-19

AWW #1

Week 3; Session 1: The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 448-450  Medieval Art

Mona pp 24-28

AWW #2

Week 3; Session 2: The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 450-463 Renaissance Art

Mona pp 32-45 

AWW # 3& #4

Week 4; Session 1:The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 464-468 Baroque Art

Mona pp 46-64 

AWW#5

Week 4; Session 2:  Review Activities; Midterm Exam

Week 5: Session 1: Age of Revolution Art of Seeing pp 468-471

Mona pp66-78

AWW#6

Week 5; Session 2: The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 472-476 Later 19th cen. Art

Mona pp 83-84 &96-112

Week 6; Session 1 & 2: The Art of Seeing Ch. 15 pp 481- The 20th Cen. art

Mona pp 123
128-138 

Week 7; Session 1:The Art of Seeing, Ch 4:  Survey of  2 D Media & Methods pp 197-322

Internet and video

Week 7; Session 2: The Art of Seeing Survey of 3 D Media  Methods pp 325-371

Week 8; Session 1: Review for midterm

Week 8; Session 2 Final Examination

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 97

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 

Appendix I: Rubric for Participation (Face to Face Class)



8 to 10 points: The quality and quantity of participation are superior. The student arrives on time, and is fully prepared with questions and comments from the reading as well as from the field. While actively, participating, the student is never intrusive. She/he allows others to have their complete say; actively and intensely listens to others and response to them on an intellectual, not personal, basis The student does not use profanity in class.



5 to 7 points: The quality and quantity of participation is significant, although quantity is sometimes substituted for quality. The student has read the assigned material, and this is evident from the observations and questions the student raises during the course of the discussions. When participating, the student most of the time observes the rules of common courtesy, buy may at times simply blurt out comments or interrupt others. Profanity may have been inadvertently used.



4 to 6 points: The quality and quantity of participation is common. Neither is noteworthy. The student generally shows up for class and may or may not be prepared for class. (It would be difficult to tell from the quantity or quality of questions and comments. He/she does not relate the material to the field. Infrequent participation is the norm, and the student usually only responds when called upon. Participation is in the form of short responses to questions or brief assertions. While willing to state a point of view, the student is unable to support this view with facts. Listening is not done carefully, and the points of view of others are not seemingly appreciated. The student is present but inattentive during video/audio presentations. Profanity was deliberately used.  



1 to 3 points: The student comes to class unprepared. There is little quality or quantity of participation, comments are rarely offered. Listening is done poorly, if at all.



0 points: The student is absent and unexcused. The participation points may not be made up for unexcused absence. In the case of true emergency (excused absence), points may be made up by acquiring lecture and discussion notes from a classmate and writing a reaction paper to them.


Participation Points, Online portion of the class:


Students must log on during the assigned window of time. (Example: Midnight on Wednesday to Midnight on Sunday of the assignment week). Students must answer or participation so that the responses reflect that the student has read and understands the material.) In a threaded discussion, comments should refer to the material. “Way to go!” and “I totally agree”. Do not demonstrate that the student has read and understand the material.




Appendix II : Tips for writing evening assessment essays.  Face to Face class



I. These essays are to assess your understanding of the material, not the class. Refer to the text or your lecture notes for subject matter.( If I write something on the board, it is probably worthy of mentioning in your essay.) If you feel the need to evaluate the evening’s content, or the class in general, add a paragraph at the end of the class or see me personally. Such evaluations to not substitute for the processing or reaction to the information given. Other than your midterm or final, this is the only assessment I have of your understanding of the content. Remember that these essays replace a quiz on the material.



2. “A one page essay” is a subjective term. In the past, size of paper has ranged from 6 x 9” steno paper to college ruled notebook paper. Regular notebook paper has 27 lines, while college ruled has 33. Right hand margins range from one-half inch, inch to a huge inch and a half.   Some people leave spaces between paragraphs, and some students have even gone as far as to skip lines. Size of handwriting also varies. I once had to enlarge an essay on the photocopy machine to read the microscopic handwriting. Average handwriting fits 8-10 words per line.



So let’s be more objective. I do not wish to be in the business of weighing and measuring essays, rather than evaluating the content, but a two hour discussion should be covered by at least 300 words. More honestly, if you cover the important points of an evening’s material, you would comfortably fill a page and would not have to count words, lines, or even worry about it. I would advise against using your word counter on your computer. I count the number of words per line, leave out small words such as “a”, “an” and “the”. After counting three or four lines, I take an average and multiply by the number of lines. I only bother to count if there is a question as to best effort. I would rather evaluate your paper on its content and merit.



3. Use proper writing techniques. An introductory sentence should state the topic for the entire essay, while each separate concept covered would have its own topic sentence and paragraph which supports it. If you are stating a strong opinion, (“Van Gogh’s brush strokes show his emotional state” or “Architecture is not art, only functional”) you must support you assertion with research or facts. Since these essays are open book, these facts will not be hard to find.

4. Even though the essay’ is open book, do not rewrite the book. I know you were here for the covered material, and am interested in your reaction to the content, not a restating of it.


Online portion of the class: The question should be referred to, quoted or referenced in your answer. The instructor should not have to reread the question to interpret your answer.

Bibliography:
 

The Art of Seeing; Zelanski & Fisher, Eighth Edition; Copyright 2011; Pearson Education, Inc; Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ ISBN 978-0-205-74834-1

The Annotated Mona Lisa; A Crash Course in Art History from Prehistoric to Modern Second Edition;  Copyright 2007 Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC, Kansas City, MO. ISBN=10: 0-8362-8005-9

Video Series Art of the Western World; Anneberg Media.  Available at McCaffee Memorial Library.

The Power Of Myth Video Series; Bill Moyers and Joseph Campbell: PBS Video; 1976

The Artchive Website

Various online resources including virtual gallery tours and examples of visual art

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:2/16/2013 11:42:17 PM