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HI 370 The American Indian
Miriani, Ronald


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HISTORY 370

THE AMERICAN INDIAN

DR. RONALD MIRIANI

SUMMER 2005

 

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION. 

            Using Indian and white sources, this course attempts to reconstruct life in selected Indian tribes before the onslaught of the whites, and studies the conflict between Native-American and Euro-American cultures.

 

II.  GOALS.

            To develop an understanding of and an appreciation for America's "non-Western" cultures.  To articulate the differences between these pre-modern cultures and the dominant Euro-American culture.

 

III. LEARNING OBJECTIVES.

            1.  To be able to describe the basic values and social structures of the following tribes: Sioux, (Iroquois), Winnebago and Pueblo Indians;

            2.  To  be able to explain the dynamics of social and structural change within a tribe resulting from outside pressures–3rd world countries like India and Japan have gone through the same thing;

            3.  To understand the nature of the conflict between “Indian” and "American" cultures;

            4.  Lastly, to develop a sense of the aesthetics of American Indian cultures, art, decoration, myths and music.

 

IV. COURSE ARRANGEMENTS.

            We meet each Monday thru Thursday, 8:00-10:15 in Mackay 32.

 

V. COURSE REQUIREMENTS.

            Students will attend all class sessions, having read the material assigned for each class period.  There will be quizzes on American Indian policy, and reaction reports of 2-3 pages on most of the books assigned.  You will tour Indian sites in the Kansas City area individually, reporting on your experience.  Students will also submit a term paper, for which guidelines are here provided, that will explore some aspect of American Indian life and culture. 

 

VI. TEXTBOOK LIST.

                        Charles Eastman, Indian Boyhood

                        John Neihardt, Black Elk Speaks

                        Barry Lopez, Giving Birth to Thunder, Sleeping with his Daughter

                        Frank Waters, The Man Who Killed the Deer

                        Paul Radin, Autobiography of a Winnebago

 

VII. TALKING TO THE PROFESSOR. 

My home phone is 746-1128.  Call before 10:00 p.m.  My office is 30 1/2 Mackay, ext. 6368.  Both phones have answering machines.  Email is

 

VIII. CLASS POLICIES.

            Academic Honesty.  "Academic honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Hence, the college will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on texts, examinations, papers or other course assignments.   Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from the college." The Park University Bulletin.

            Work that is submitted after the due date shall be reduced by one grade if submitted within a week, by two grades if submitted later.

            Students missing no more than 1 class shall receive an "A" for attendance, 2 classes "B", 3 classes "C", 4 classes "D".  Explained/excused absences count for half a class.

 

IX. GRADING POLICY.

Students accumulate points for attendance (10% of grade), participation in class (10% of grade), quizzes & response papers to assigned class material (45%), term paper with oral presentation (25%), field trip(s) (10%).

 

X. The Course

 

I.  INTRODUCTION: [6/6-7]

            THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HISTORY, WHITE AND RED

            1.  Syllabus and Course Objectives. 

                        The problem of studying a foreign culture, especially American Indians!

            2.  European-American stereotypes of Indians; Indians stereotypes of Americans

            2.  The task of a historian, Indian or White.

                        The problem of objectivity.  Who gets to tell the story?

            3.  Creation Stories.  Hebrew (Genesis), Greece, India.

            4.  Where Did They Come From: The Clovis Story

 

            Reading: Read Genesis chapters 1-3 and handouts.  Reading the creation traditions of one Indian tribe, tell that story orally to the class as though you were a member of that tribe.  You will start your oral report with a statement like “We believe....,” or “Once long ago....”

            Film: America’s Stone-Age Explorers (Nova, 2004)

 

II.  STONE AGE INDIANS: ANASAZI AND MOUND BUILDERS [6/8-9]

            Oral Reports (see above)

            Film: Cahokia Mounds: Ancient Metropolis

            Film: Anasazi: The Ancient Ones

 

            A visit to two pre-historic Indian cultures via film.  You will take notes, we will discuss each film and then you will write a paper contrasting the two. 

 

III. THE TOOLS FOR RESEARCHING AMERICAN INDIANS [6/13]

            Submit a contrast paper of Cahokia and Anasazi Indians. 

            Anthony F. C. Wallace, A Theory of Cultural Evolution (a handout)

            "Scout's Guide to Indian History," by Ron Miriani (Handout)

 

IV. WOODLANDS INDIANS: THE IROQUOIS AND A THEORY OF CULTURAL                                                                                                 EVOLUTION [6/14]

            Submit a review of Indian Boyhood. 

            Doing Iroquois culture in one day!

            Movie: Black Robe

 

 

V. INDIANS OF THE SOUTHEAST: POWHATAN AND CHEROKEE [6/15]

                                                            INDIANS OF THE MISSIONS

           

            Film: Gente de Razon (Texas Missions)

            Film: Mission (contrast of Brazil)

 

V. INDIAN FOLKLIFE AND FOLKLORE [6/16 and 6/23]

 

            Reading: Barry Lopez, Giving Birth to Thunder, Sleeping with his Daughter

            Lopez is a western writer who collected various tribes’ stories about the coyote. 

 

You will do a field trip on your own.  Nelson Gallery, Kansas City Museum, Shawnee Indian Mission, Wyandot Cemetery,[the Line Creek Museum is closed], or take in an Indian festival.

 

            Bring to class on the 27th a paper in which you describe Indian folklore as you know it from reading the stories of Lopez and visiting an arts site.

 

VI.  EVOLUTION OF EUROPEAN (AND AMERICAN) INDIAN POLICY TO 1876 [6/20]

            Xeroxed article: Edmund S. Morgan, “The American Indian: Incorrigible Individualist.”

            Spanish Indian Policy: The Missions of Texas and California.

            Video: San Jose Mission in Texas.

 

VII. WARRIORS AND MEDICINE MEN ON THE PLAINS: THE SIOUX [6/21-22]

            John Neihardt, Black Elk Speaks.

            1.  Intro. and Vision of Black Elk (chapters 1-3)

            2.  At War with the Wasichus (chapters 4-11)

            3.  Black Elk's Travels and Lesser Visions (chapters 21-25)

            4.  Black Elk's Return: More Visions and Wounded Knee (chapters 21-25)

            A close reading of Black Elk, with some film and looking at other accounts of Sioux life.

            Film: Little Big Man or A Man Called Horse

 

VIII. THE DAWES ACT (1887) AND FEDERAL INDIAN POLICY, FROM 1887 TO 1933 [6/27]

            Reading: Handout.

            Bring to class a review of Black Elk Speaks

 

IX. CAUGHT BETWEEN TWO CULTURES: ONE CONFUSED WINNEBAGO [6/27-28]

            Paul Radin, Autobiography of a Winnebago.              

            1. The Story of S.B.  Part I of the Autobiography

            2. Teachings of the Fathers.  Part II.

 

X.   THE PUEBLOS OF THE SOUTHWEST [6/29-30]

            Bring to class on the 29 a review of S. B. from Black Elk’s point of view. 

            Frank Waters, The Man Who Killed the Deer

            1. History of the Pueblo Peoples (chapters 1-5)

            2. Red and White: Conflict Hopi Style (chapters 6-9)

            3. New Deal Indian Policy and Resolution (finish)

  

XI.  AMERICAN INDIAN POLICY SINCE THE NEW DEAL [6/30]

            1.  The New Deal Re-tribalizes by creating Indian corporations.

            2.  Indian Claims Act of 1949 Draws Attention to the Grievances of All Tribes

            3.  De-tribalization during the Eisenhower administration (1953-1960)

            4.  Indians During the Hippie Era: We Loved Them All

                        Custer Died For Your Sins

            5.  Nixon Loved Indians: Re-tribalization (1969-Present).  A mixed bag.

           

            Due on July 1st, a review of Pueblo life, contrasting it with other Indian cultures.  

 

Movies and Videos

 

A Man Called Horse

The West (Ken Burns)

Black Robe

Little Big Man

America’s Stone Age Explorers

Gente de Razon

Mission (Spanish-Portuguese Indian Mission of Brazil)

Anasazi

America’s Stone-Age Explorers

Cahokia Mounds: Ancient Metropolis