Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

CS 360 Database Management
Hubbard, William B.


SYLLABUS

I. COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: CS 360

II.  COURSE DESCRIPTOR: Core Course – Individual Instruction

III. COURSE TITLE:  Database Management

IV.  SEMESTER/TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT: SPRING 2005

V.  NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: William B. Hubbard

VI.  TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Senior Instructor

VII. FACULTY LOCATION: Fort Myer, Bldg. 404-112

VIII. FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: Saturday 1300-1400 (or by phone when available).

IX. FACULTY OFFICE NUMBER: (703) 527-5258 or (703) 578-0521(Home)

X. FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: william.hubbard@pirate.park.edu

XI. OTHER PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: whubbard392003@yahoo.com

XII. DATES OF THE SEMESTER/TERM: 10 January – 13 March 2005.

XIII. CLASS SESSION DAYS:  Saturday.

XIV. CLASS SESSION TIMES:  1300 - 1800

XV. PREREQUISITE: CS 219.3:0:3

XVI. CREDIT HOURS: 3.0

XVII.   MISSION STATEMENT:

The mission of Park university, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

XIII.  VISION STATEMENT:

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

XIV. COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course provides an overview of database system concepts.  The course will deal with file organization methods, database models, data integrity and security, and database administration issues.  The student will be introduced to application program development in a database environment with emphasis on setting up, modifying, and querying a database.

XX. FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:

I encourage lively discussion based on both my experiences and the students’ experiences along with our current activities.  Moreover, each student is encouraged to engage interactively with both fellow students and instructor to share and provide experiences with research and laboratory activities from both class assignments and employment activities. Each student is encouraged to bring and discuss articles from periodicals, newspapers, Internet and technical writings that are germane to the Database Management discipline.

XXI. COURSE OBJECTIVES:

Each student is required to successfully complete nine homework quizzes consisting mainly of definitions; three RDBMS labs assignments using a Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) of the student’s choice; satisfactory completion of both the Mid-Term and Final Exams, and a Term Paper on at least three RDBMSs.  Each student will verbally present (if time permits) one or more of their labs assignments to the class during the term.  All students will verbally present their Term Paper to the class.

Note:  Any attached MSWord files should be in MSWord 97 or above.

1. Values Literacy: The students will be able to define database methodologies and terms.  In addition, the students will also be able to explain the difference between a relational database, an indexed sequential database, a network database and a flat file database.  The students will learn to recognize major ways proposed for resolving value questions and the ability to identify and use them where appropriate on particular database solutions.

2. Critical Literacy: The student will learn the uses of computer systems as tools for management and communication in terms of gathering, analyzing, evaluating, processing, and distributing information.

3.  Civic Literacy: The student will be able to distinguish the use of computers and how they are applied to every-day life.  The students will also understand the social, political, and economic issues in developing, designing and implementing a computer system database.

4.  Scientific Literacy: The student will examine the skills and mechanics required for the effective use of computer systems as a tool for problem examination, evaluation, and resolution.

5.  The student will accomplish the following:

a. Describe components of a database management system;

b. Describe techniques used to store and access data with DBMS;

c. Design a database and establish procedures for updating it;

d. Describe the duties of the database administrator;

e. Describe how data dictionaries are used;

f. Discuss issues related to privacy and security in a database environment; and

g. Understand the basic fundamentals of Structured Query Language (SQL).

XXII. COURSE TEXTBOOKS:

Modern Database Management, Sixth Edition by McFadden, Hoffer, and Prescott, Prentice Hall ISBN-0-13-033969-5, 2002.  For the term paper, either the American Psychological Association (APA) style or the Modern Language Association (MLA) style will be the only writing styles accepted.

Supplemental Resources:

1.   Database Management Systems, McGraw-Hill, 2001.

2.   Database Management, John Wiley & Sons, 1998.

           

3.   Database Systems: Concepts, Languages, & Architectures,

McGraw-Hill, 1999.

4.   The Relational Database Model: A Retrospective Review

and Analysis: A Historical Account and Assessment of E.F. Cobb’s

Contribution to Database Technology, Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 2000.

5.   The Data Model Resource Book:

A Library of Data Models for Specific Industries,

John Wiley & Sons, 2001.

6.   Database Design for Mere Mortals: A Hands-On Guide

to Relational Database Design,

Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 2000.

XXIII. ACADEMIC HONESTY:

“Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of the policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life."

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 101

XXIV. PLAGIARISM:

Plagiarism:

“Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another’s idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.”

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 101

XXV. ATTENDANCE POLICY:

"Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.

Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.

In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".

A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.

Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.

Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency."

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100

XXVI. LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:

Homework problems will be assigned throughout the course.  Homework is due at the beginning of class.  Students cannot work on due homework during class. Homework problems collected will be graded.  If for some reason, you are absent, or going to be absent, you must turn in your homework prior to the date due for homework.  Homework will be graded for only those dates/times due.  For any homework not submitted on time, grades will be reduced 5 points for each week late.  After two (2) weeks of homework not submitted, the student will receive a grade of ZERO for that particular homework. 

XXVI. COURSE ASSESSMENT:

The course will consist of Lectures, Class Discussions, Computer Lab Sessions, Computer Lab Assignments, Reports, Briefings, Weekly Homework Quizzes, Midterm and Final Exams, Term Paper combined with Presentation. 

The student will accomplish the following:

a. Describe components of a database management system;

b. Describe techniques used to store and access data with DBMS;

c. Design a database and establish procedures for updating it;

d. Describe the duties of the database administrator;

e. Describe how data dictionaries are used;

f. Discuss issues related to privacy and security in a database environment; and

g. Understand the basic fundamentals of Structured Query Language (SQL).

Additionally, each student’s homework must be typed (via word processor) and neat. 

XXVIII. CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT:

Understand that computers can cause problems as printers run-out of ink and hard drives crash.  Students will ensure that work is properly saved on floppy drives or CDs for backup.  Students should also make hard copies for backup purposes.

Each student will properly turn off computers and straighten chairs and desks before departing the classroom.

Additionally, each student will ensure that no trash is left on the desks, work areas, or floors before departing the classroom.  

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply special directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with Federal and State Law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, and or/State Law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures can be found on the Park University web page:

http://www.park.edu/disability

XXIX. COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENT:

DATE

CHAPTER(S)

TOPIC(s)

STUDY ASSIGNMENT

15 January 2005

(Week 1)

1-2

The Database Environment and Database Development Process.

Read Chapters 1 & 2;

Answer questions at end of Chap. 1 & 2.

22 January 2005

(Week 2)

3

Modeling Data in the Organization.

Read Chapter 3;

Answer questions at end of Chapter 3.  Homework Assn. Chap. 1 & 2 Due.

29 January 2005

(Week 3)

4

MID-TERM Exam Review

The Enhanced E-R Model and Business Rules.

Lab # 1 Due; Read Chapter 4; Answer questions at end of Chapter 4. Homework Assn. Chap. 3 Due.

5 February 2005

(Week 4)

5

MID-TERM Exam

Logical database Design and the Relational Model

Read Chapter 5; Answer questions at end of Lesson 5; Homework Assn. Chap.4 Due.

12 February 2005

(Week 5)

6

Physical Database Design and Performance

Read Chapter 6; Lab # 2 Due; Answer questions at end of Chap. 6; Homework Assn. Chap. 5 Due.

19 February 2005

(Week 6)

7-8

SQL, Advanced SQL

Read Chapters 7 & 8; Answer questions at end of Chapters 7 & 8. Homework Assn. Chap. 6 Due.

26 February 2005

(Week 7)

9-10

Client-Server Database Environment, The Internet Database Environment.

Lab # 3 Due; Read Chapters 9 & 10; Answer questions at end of Chap. 9 & 10; Homework Assn. Chaps. 7 & 8 Due.

5 March 2005 May 2004

(Week 8)

FINAL Exam Review

FINAL Exam Review and Project Presentations

Homework Assn. Chapters 9 &10 Due; Final Exam Review; Presentations

12 March 2005

(Week 9)

FINAL Exam

FINAL Exam and Project Presentations

Presentations and Final Exam.

XXX.  GRADING PLAN:

Ten homework quizzes, class participation, three labs, a midterm exam, a term paper, and a final exam will determine your course grade. Further details of labs and term paper with presentation will be covered in class.  The relative weight of the course will be as follows:

METHOD

PERCENT

POINTS

Homework Quizzes (10)

 10% (Collectively)

 100

Class Participation

 5% (Collectively)

   50

Labs (3)

 10% (Collectively)

 100

Midterm Exam

 20%

 200

Report

 25%

 250

Final Exam

 30%

 300

***TOTAL***

100%

1000

Points:

A = 95-100%                            1000-950

B = 85-94%                             949-850

C = 75-84%                             849-750

D = 70-74%                             749-700

F = Less than 70%                    699-Below

Making Up Final Examinations:

Only extraordinary circumstances warrant a student's being allowed to make up a missed final examination.  It is the student's responsibility to contact the instructor before the scheduled exam or by the end of the first working day after the day of the missed exam to request permission to take a make-up exam.  In the process of determining whether a make-up exam should be allowed, the burden of proof is on the student.  The instructor has the right to request verification of any excuse offered by the student.

The student who is denied permission to take a make-up exam may appeal immediately to the Academic Director or Resident Center Administrator. The appeal must be made by the end of the first working day after the day of the denial.  The appeal will be forwarded immediately to the Assistant Vice President for Extended Learning whose decision will be final.